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Know some Muscle Energy Technique for Anterior and Posterior Ilium

What Is Muscle Energy Technique?

In 1948, Fred Mitchel Sr, D.O. developed a type of osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) known as the "Muscle Energy Technique (MET)." MET improves musculoskeletal function by mobilizing joints, stretching tight muscles and fascia, reducing pain, and improving circulation and lymphatic flow (Waxenbaum, 2020). In simple terms, MET is a hands-on approach to treatment that uses the therapist's manual resistance to help the patient move their muscles. Hence, it is believed to work by mobilizing adhesions and restoring normal joint motion. As a result, MET provides pain relief, improves function, and reduces muscle tension. While the exact mechanisms are still being studied, there's plenty of anecdotal evidence to suggest that MET can be an effective treatment for various conditions.

What Are Some Common Active Technique Treatments Aside from Muscle Energy Technique?

There are many different types of Active Technique treatments, but some of the most common include:

Myofascial release: This involves applying gentle pressure to the fascia (the connective tissue surrounding muscles) to release tension and improve blood flow. There has been some debate about myofascial release, with some questioning its efficacy. However, a growing body of research suggests that myofascial release therapy can benefit many conditions.

• Muscle stripping: This technique uses manual resistance to "strip" or lengthens muscles. So, what is muscle stripping? Muscle stripping is a technique that uses manual pressure and movement to separate and stretch the muscle fibers. This is said to help improve blood circulation and promote the healing of injured muscles.

It's used to treat a variety of issues, such as Tendonitis, Muscle pain, Scar tissue, Stress, Fractures, Muscle Knots

Furthermore, muscle stripping is a massage used to treat muscle pain and tension. It is believed to work by breaking up knots and adhesions in the muscles, which can relieve pain and improve flexibility. This procedure is generally performed on the abdomen, hips, and thighs. To perform muscle stripping, the therapist will first apply a layer of oil to the area that needs treatment. They will then use their fingers or a tool to massage and stretch the muscles, which helps break down any knots or tension. This process is repeated until the therapist is satisfied with the results.

Moreover, the side effects of muscle stripping can vary depending on the individual but may include swelling, bruising, pain, and numbness. In some cases, patients may experience temporary difficulty walking or standing.

Nevertheless, muscle stripping is often used to treat chronic pain, tension headaches, and carpal tunnel syndrome. It can also be helpful for athletes who are looking to improve their performance and reduce the risk of injury.

• Isometric holds: In this treatment, the therapist will ask the patient to contract their muscles against resistance for a certain period. This treatment is thought to help relieve muscle tension because it causes the muscle fibers to stretch and recoil. This helps break down the knots or adhesions that can form in the muscle tissue, leading to pain and tension.

You'll need to find a sturdy surface like a table or countertop to do an isometric hold. Place your hand on the surface and squeeze your hand and forearm muscles as hard as you can for 10 seconds. Release and rest for 10 seconds, then repeat the hold for another 10 seconds. Do this for a total of three rounds.

So, what are the risks of isometric holds? Well, like any type of exercise, there is always a risk of injury. If you're not careful, you could end up straining or even tearing your muscles. That's why it's important to start slowly and gradually build up the intensity of your holds.

Another thing to watch out for is cramping. If you hold your muscles in a static position for too long, you might start to experience cramps. This is usually nothing to worry about, but you should speak to your therapist if the cramps are severe or persistent.

There are a few occasions when you should avoid doing isometric holds. If you're pregnant, have high blood pressure, or are recovering from surgery, it's best to speak to your musculoskeletal specialist before starting this treatment. Additionally, it's important to stop and consult your musculoskeletal specialist as soon as possible if you experience any pain or discomfort during an isometric hold.

How Can Muscle Energy Technique Help With Anterior and Posterior Ilium Pain?

Here are some ways on how Muscle Energy Technique (MET) can help with anterior and posterior ilium pain:

Stretching the muscle helps to lengthen it and improve flexibility. When the muscle is flexible, it can work more efficiently and with less tension. This can help to reduce pain and discomfort.

Breathing helps to control muscle tension and relaxation. It also helps improve blood circulation, providing more oxygen and nutrients to the muscle. This can further reduce pain and discomfort, as well as improve healing.

To maximize the effects of MET, you can also do follow-up self-massage at home. Self-massage helps break up scar tissue and adhesions, which can cause pain and restrict movement. It also helps to increase blood circulation and improve healing.

Does Muscle Energy Technique Have Any Side Effects?

There are some risks associated with using Muscle Energy Technique. As with any physical therapy, there is always a chance of injury. You could pull a muscle or even damage your joint if you're not careful.

Another thing to be aware of is that MET can be pretty intense. Some people find it uncomfortable, and it can take a while to get used to the sensation. It's important to start slowly and build up your tolerance gradually.

As with any musculoskeletal treatment, always consult a musculoskeletal specialist like Paula Nutting before starting MET. They can advise you on whether it's the right choice and help you avoid any possible side effects.

How to Address Anterior and Posterior Ilium Pain?

Anterior and Posterior Ilium Pain can be addressed through stretching, breathing, and self-massage. Stretching is key to releasing tension in the muscle and preparing it for movement. A good stretch technique is important to elongate the muscle without causing pain or discomfort.

Breathing is also essential for effective MET. You need to ensure you're breathing deeply and rhythmically to get the most out of the stretch.

Finally, self-massage is a great way to release any tension that has built up in the muscle. A good massage technique will help increase blood flow and reduce inflammation.

How Can I Stretch Effectively?

There are a few things to keep in mind when stretching effectively.

First, always warm up your muscles before stretching. This can be done by taking a light jog, jumping jacks, or simply marching in place.

Second, be sure to hold each stretch for at least 20 seconds. This will allow the muscle to relax and lengthen.

Third, don't bounce as you stretch. This can cause the muscle to tear and may lead to injury.

How Can I Stretch Effectively?

When using Muscle Energy Techniques, breathing deeply and rhythmically is important to achieve the best results.

Not only does this help to relax the body and clear the mind, but it also helps move the energy around the body correctly.

Deep diaphragmatic breathing is done by contracting the stomach muscles to push the air out of the lungs. It allows you to use 100% of your lung capacity and increases your lung efficiency.

How Can I Self-Massage Effectively?

There are a few ways to self-massage effectively. One is to use a massage ball or foam roller to target specific muscles. Another is to use your hands to massage the affected area. And finally, you can use a technique called compression massage, which involves pressing down on the muscle with your fingers or thumbs. 

Watch This Video and Subscribe to Learn More!

Searching for effective techniques to resolve your patient's hip pain? Paula Nutting, Your Musculoskeletal Specialist, discusses Anterior and Posterior Ilium pain relief using Muscle Energy Technique (MET). Try it now! click here

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLQnZ2CqghY

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References

Stenersen, B., & Bordoni, B. (2022, January). Osteopathic manipulative treatment: Muscle energy procedure - cervical vertebrae. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved July 7, 2022, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK560706/

Cleveland Clinic. (2022, March 30). Diaphragmatic breathing exercises & benefits. Retrieved July 7, 2022, from https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/9445-diaphragmatic-breathing

Physiopedia. (2022, April 13). Muscle energy technique. Retrieved July 7, 2022, from https://www.physio-pedia.com/Muscle_Energy_Technique

Fleckenstein, J. (2010, February 11). Discrepancy between prevalence and perceived effectiveness of treatment methods in myofascial pain syndrome: Results of a cross-sectional, nationwide survey - BMC musculoskeletal disorders. BioMed Central. https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2474-11-32

hand over painful neck

Stiff Neck Causes and Remedial Self-Massage for Relief

The pain a stiff neck brings about can be very bothersome and serve as a hindrance when it comes to carrying out the tasks that we need to do everyday. But what exactly causes this tightness in our necks? I was thinking about just general ways that I can give you a little bit of help with some aches and pains. As you know, I've tried to specialize in musculoskeletal, hence the name. We also look at what's going on with the connective tissue as well. Things about joints, the fascia, the nervous system and ways to actually make you feel like you are feeling stable. Today, I'm going to focus on the neck and give you some tips on how you can relieve a ropy and bandy scalene if you’re on your own or cannot come into the clinic to see someone like me.

Causes of Stiff Neck:

  • Looking down for a long period while reading, writing, or using your phone;
  • Excessive or vigorous movement of the neck;
  • Sleeping in the wrong position, which exerts too much pressure on the neck
  • Clenching the jaw;
  • High stress levels;
  • Medical conditions such as osteoarthritis and spinal disorders
  • Trauma to the neck or back due to injuries, a hunched posture, or picking heavy weights; and
  • Sudden movement of the head due to whiplash, which can pull your neck muscles and also can give rise to other serious symptoms.
Source: Vaughan, J. (2021)

Treatment:

  • Feel along the suboccipital ridge all the way along, both sides, to see if they feel even.
  • The area that feels painful, is not the area of complaint.
  • Gently tuck your chin down and feel around the back of the lower part of your skull (the top 3 survival muscles) and feel around the lateral joints.
  • Feel with two fingers and do some cross-fiber work .
  • Keep your shoulders down so you do not activate the trapezius muscles.
  • Once you find the tight ridge, palpate and see if you can feel into the area where the ribs are.
  • Feel for the upper trapezius and duck anteriorly to it, then press your fingers down into that tight space.
  • Palpate around the other side to see if it’s the same or different.
  • Drop your ear down to give a little bit of softness to the tissue of the lateral neck which will allow you to really sink deeper into the muscle.
  • Press and depress onto that region of the lower neck, it is the area that feels like it would be accessing your first rib, by doing this movement we are also making small changes to the restrictions or tightness over the second rib.
  • Laterally flex away from the area and give yourself a little active stretch while sinking down a little deeper.
  • As you work along your neck, press towards it and then gently glide away.
  • Repeat the process one more time this time moving a little more medially. Come closer to the neck dropping down and in.
  • Start to pull away and take the chin away, then try to access those fibers for posterior scalene, dropping down and back then coming along and forward.
  • Palpate and see if that made a difference. The scalene should be feeling less taught and bandy, and you should feel better through the range.
I want you to think about the things that make a difference to the neck. Sometimes we have to look at other distal attachments. We can apply joint play on our first and second ribs if they are stiff, palpate along the clavicle where the subclavius is and work on those fibres. Focusing also on the pectoralis major and minor to improve functional movement of the clavicle and shoulder joints. Assess one side versus the other to see if the problems felt in the neck can be compared to and aligned with the tightness felt in the chest tissues. Watching the video attached to this blog will assist you greatly in some self-treatment options whenever you feel restricted in the neck. References: Source: Vaughan, J. (2021) How to Get Rid of a Stiff Neck. eMediHealth. Retrieved from https://www.emedihealth.com/bones-joints/manage-stiff-neck#some_causes_of_a_stiff_neck
inner leg tightness exercise

Treat Inner Leg Tightness Fast With This Simple Trick!

Long and Short Adductor Muscles

What are the adductor muscles how can we treat them? The adductor muscles are called adductor muscles because they add or adduct in. Anatomically, when we think of them, they are going to be attached to the pubic bone, and attach to either the femur or the pes anserine. The latter being our two longer joint adductors. Our adductor muscles assist us when it comes to moving the leg inwards. When the leg moves toward the body, it uses the longer adductors as the primary movers, and when the knee is in flexion, it uses mostly the shorter ones including brevis, and etcetera. The adductor muscles play a huge role in hip stability and pelvic control. They need to be treated if we see pain or instability of the ilia, the knee, in general tightness with sitting wide legged or cross legged. Moreover, it is also an indication for treatment if there has been sporting injuries where the pubic bone or soft tissue of the hip, thigh or pelvis is present.

Treating the Adductor Muscles

If you are going to treat someone who has any of the symptoms listed above the best way to do so is by having them lay sideways. To begin, we should first asses the ability to list the affected leg in both straight and knee bent movements. Why do we do this? It is so we can get an understanding of whether the short or longer adductors (or both) need to be treated. In the video demonstration below we can see that there is more weakness and incorrect lifting when the knee is bent and the longer adductors removed from the assessment. This meant my focus of treatment would be closer to the upper leg (proximal) rather than if she was weak and felt pain with a straight knee.

Steps to Follow

  1. Start to feel around the inner leg and gently palpate for muscle hypertonicity (muscle feels tight).
  2. With some lotion or lubricant, place your hands at around a 45 degree angle towards the upper inner thigh and slowly glide along the tissue—starting from just above the knee, towards the pubic bone.
  3. If you come across any taught bands, you can cross fiber across the belly of the muscle/s using a gentle action. There are loads of nerves housed along the inner thighs so this can be painful if too deep or too quickly frictioned.
  4. We can also work into the muscle groups palpating for long bands of firm or tight muscles. These normally run along the line of the femur and not across it. To address these restrictions, let us apply a positional release technique. The bands can start anywhere above the knee and soften midway along the femur or in nasty restricted cases all the way up to the pubic attachments.
  5. Now, making use of both your hands, place each thumb on the area where the tautness begins and  push your thumbs towards each other. This is called the positional release technique, which is an excellent way to change the tension between two ends of the muscle fiber. We actually shorten the muscle belly by physically bunching it into the middle. Think about an uncooked sausage and if you apply pressure at each end and direct towards the middle, then that area has less tension.
  6. Hold the positional release until you can feel a sensation at the tendons where it feels like it’s softening. For about 90 seconds or until you feel that the muscles start to give. It should feel slightly uncomfortable but not dreadful.
  7. Start to feel around the inner leg once again, and gently palpate for any further restrictions of the muscle. If there is still some tightness, repeat the process.
The video below shows me treating Kristen’s adductor muscles. We can see that in the start of the video she is experiencing hip flexion as well as difficulty when lifting her lower leg. Then after completing all these steps, we can see that she is feeling less tenderness in her adductor muscles and can actually lift her leg more easily in a better range. Watch the full video instruction below: Sources: Hank Grebehttps://www.istockphoto.com/photo/male-hip-adductor-complex-muscles-anterior-view-isolated-on-human-skeleton-gm1271838675-374300620?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=srp_photos_top&utm_content=https%3A%2F%2Funsplash.com%2Fs%2Fphotos%2Fadductor-muscles&utm_term=adductor%20muscles%3A%3Asearch-aggressive-affiliates-v1%3Aa Adductor Magnus. (2012). Physiopedia. https://www.physio pedia.com/Adductor_Magnus
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